Bitglass Security Spotlight: DoD, Facebook & NASA

By Will Houcheime, Product Marketing Manager, Bitglass

red arrow with news icon

Here are the top cybersecurity stories of recent weeks: 

—Cybersecurity vulnerabilities found in US missile system
—Facebook shares private user data with Amazon, Netflix, and Spotify
—Personal information of NASA employees exposed
—Chinese nationals accused of hacking into major US company databases
—Private complaints of Silicon Valley employees exposed via Blind

Cybersecurity vulnerabilities found in US missile system
The United States Department of Defense conducted a security audit on the U.S. ballistic missile system and found shocking results. The system’s security was outdated and not in keeping with protocol. The audit revealed that the US’s ballistic system was lacking data encryption, antivirus programs, and multifactor authentication. Additionally, the Department of Defense also found 28-year-old security gaps that were leaving computers vulnerable to local and remote attacks. Obviously, the Missile Defense Agency must improve its cybersecurity posture before the use of defense weaponry is required.

Facebook shares private user data with Amazon, Netflix, and Spotify
The security of Facebook users continues to be in question due to the company’s illicit use of private messages. The New York Times discovered Facebook documents from 2017 that explained how companies such as Spotify and Netflix were able to access private messages from over 70 million users per month. There are reports that suggest that companies had the ability to read, write, and delete these private messages on Facebook, which is disturbing news to anyone who uses the popular social network.

Personal information of NASA employees exposed
The personally identifiable information (PII) of current and former NASA employees was compromised early last year. The organization reached out to the affected individuals notifying them of the data breach. The identity of the intruder was unknown; however, it was confirmed that the breach allowed Social Security numbers to be compromised. 

Chinese nationals accused of hacking into major US company databases
A group of hackers working for the Chinese government has been indicted by the U.S. Government for stealing intellectual property from tech companies. While the companies haven’t been named, prosecutors have charged two Chinese nationals with computer hacking, conspiracy to commit wire fraud, and aggravated identity theft.

Private complaints of Silicon Valley employees exposed via Blind
A social networking application by the name of Blind failed to secure sensitive user information when it left a database server completely exposed. Blind allows users to anonymously discuss topics including tech, finance, e-commerce, as well as the happenings within their workplace  (the app is used by employees of over 70,000 different companies). Anyone who knew how to find the online server had the ability to view each user’s account information without the use of a password. Unfortunately, this security lapse exposed users’ identities and, consequently, allowed their employers to be implicated in their work-related stories.

To learn about cloud access security brokers (CASBs) and how they can protect your enterprise from ransomware, data leakage, misconfigurations, and more, download the Definitive Guide to CASBs.

Bitglass Security Spotlight: Financial Services Facing Cyberattacks

By Will Houcheime, Product Marketing Manager, Bitglass

young man in hoodie staring at financial screens

Here are the top cybersecurity stories of recent months:

—Customer information exposed in Bankers Life hack
—American Express India leaves customers defenseless
—Online HSBC accounts breached
—Millions of dollars taken from major Pakistani banks
—U.S. government infrastructure accessed via DJI drones

Customer information exposed in Bankers Life hack
566,000 individuals have been notified that their personal information has been exposed. Unauthorized third parties breached Bankers Life websites by obtaining employee credentials. The hackers were then able to access personal information belonging to applicants and customers; for example, the last four digits of Social Security numbers, full names, addresses, and more.

American Express India leaves customers defenseless
Through an unsecured server, 689,262 American Express India records were found in plain text. Anyone who came across the database housing this information could easily access personally identifiable information (PII) such as customer names, phone numbers, and addresses. The extent of access is not currently known.

Online HSBC accounts breached
HSBC has announced that about 1% of its U.S. customers’ bank accounts have been hacked. The bank has stated that the attackers had access to account numbers, balances, payee details, and more. Naturally, financial details are highly sensitive and must be thoroughly protected.

Millions of dollars taken from major Pakistani banks
According to the Federal Investigation Agency (FIA), almost all of the major Pakistani banks have been affected by a cybersecurity breach. This event exposed the details of over 19,000 debit cards from 22 different banks. This was the biggest cyberattack to ever hit the banking system of Pakistan, resulting in a loss of $2.6 million dollars.

U.S. government infrastructure accessed via DJI drones
Da Jiang Innovations (DJI) was accused of leaking confidential U.S. law enforcement information to the Chinese government. DJI quickly denied the passing of any information to another organization. However, it has since been determined that DJI’s data security was inadequate, and that sensitive information could be easily accessed by unauthorized third parties.

To defend against these threats, financial services firms should adopt a comprehensive security solution like a cloud access security broker (CASB.)

To learn more about the state of security in financial services, download Bitglass’ 2018 Financial Breach Report.

Bitglass Security Spotlight: Breaches Expose Millions of Emails, Texts, and Call Logs

By Will Houcheime, Product Marketing Manager, Bitglass

red arrow with news icon

Here are the top cybersecurity stories of recent weeks: 

—773 million email accounts published on hacking forum
— Unprotected FBI data and Social Security numbers found online
— Millions of texts and call logs exposed on unlocked server
—South Korean Defense Ministry breached by hackers
—Ransomware forces City Hall of Del Rio to work offline

773 million email accounts published on hacking forum
Data breaches have been a significant topic for organizations in the past few years, but this latest data breach in particular, emphasizes the importance of proper cybersecurity. This monumental breach revealed 772,904,991 unique email addresses and over 21 million unique passwords. This immense volume of credentials was posted to a hacking forum just two weeks into the new year.

Unprotected FBI data and Social Security numbers found online
A cybersecurity researcher by the name of Greg Pollock found 3 terabytes of unprotected data from the Oklahoma Securities Commission. This included sensitive FBI data, including files whose creation dated back to 2012. Social Security numbers were also found, some of which were collected as far back as the1980s. The FBI has not confirmed or denied the data breach but, according to UpGuard, the cybersecurity firm investigating, this data breach is significant and affects the entire agency statewide.

Millions of texts and call logs exposed on unlocked server
Voipo, a California communications provider, left a database full of text messages and call logs completely exposed. A cybersecurity researcher found this unprotected server with 6 million text messages and 8 million call logs. The data also included documents with encryptedpasswords that would put the company at risk if accessed by a malicious user.

South Korea Defense Ministry breached by hackers
Data on weapons and munitions acquisitions were exposed when a South Korean government agency’s computer systems were breached. This data included military weapons such as concepts of fighter aircrafts. The attackers were able to hack into an unsecured server for a program that is present on all government computers. The South Korean National Intelligence Service investigated the data breach and, although they have disclosed the occurrence to the public, they have not announced whether or not they’ve discovered the identity of the hackers.

Ransomware forces City Hall of Del Rio to work offline
Del Rio City Hall servers were shut down after a ransomware attack. The Management Information Systems (MIS) department had no choice but to stop all devices from connecting to the internet to halt the spread of the malware. With no access to data online, employees of each department were then forced to use pen and paper for all of their daily operations. City Hall officials have reported the incident to the FBI but it is still unclear whether or not data has been compromised or who was behind the attack.

To learn about cloud access security brokers (CASBs) and how they can protect your enterprise from ransomware, data leakage, misconfigurations, and more, download the Definitive Guide to CASBs

Bitglass Security Spotlight: US Government Breaches Abound

By Jacob Serpa, Product Manager, Bitglass

man reading cybersecurity headlines in newspaperHere are the top cybersecurity headlines of recent weeks:

—Healthcare.gov breached
—US weapons systems contain cybersecurity gaps
—Over 35 million US voter records for sale
—National Guard faces ransomware attack

Healthcare.gov breached

75,000 people had their personal details stolen when hackers breached a government system that is frequently used to help individuals sign up for healthcare plans. Obviously, the information contained in the system was highly sensitive; for example, Social Security numbers. There are plans in motion for helping those affected through services like credit protection.

US weapons systems contain cybersecurity gaps

A new report finds that American weapons systems contain cybersecurity vulnerabilities. The US Department of Defense is reported to have neglected best security practices in these systems. These security gaps are described as being “mission-critical.”

Over 35 million US voter records for sale

An online forum that is well known for selling information exposed in data breaches was recently found to boast more than 35 million US voter records. Exposed data includes names, phone numbers, physical addresses, and much more belonging to residents of 19 states. Unfortunately, the accuracy of these private details was confirmed by experts. As such, anyone can purchase this sensitive information whenever they please.

National Guard faces ransomware attack

In Indiana, the National Guard was recently the victim of a ransomware attack. A system housing the personal details of military personnel and civilians was compromised in the event. The good news is that the attack is not believed to be a part of a coordinated assault on the National Guard – the organization was supposedly not specifically targeted. Regardless, information was exposed.

To learn about cloud access security brokers (CASBs) and how they can protect your enterprise from ransomware, data leakage, misconfigurations, and more, download the Definitive Guide to CASBs.

Bitglass Security Spotlight: Twitter, PyRoMine, & Stresspaint

By Jacob Serpa, Product Marketing Manager, Bitglass

man holding coffee cup and reading newspaper cybersecurity industry newsHere are the top cybersecurity stories of recent weeks:

—Twitter exposes user credentials in plaintext
—PyRoMine mines Monero and disables security
—Stresspaint malware hunts Facebook credentials
—MassMiner malware mines cryptocurrency
—Access Group Education Lending breached

Twitter exposes user credentials in plaintext

Despite the fact that Twitter doesn’t store or display users’ credentials in plaintext, the social media company recently had a security mishap. Passwords were stored in internal logs before they were successfully obfuscated, exposing them to employees in plaintext. While the information wasn’t made viewable to outside parties, it’s still a cause for concern for Twitter’s users.

PyRoMine mines Monero and disables security

New malware, PyRoMine, leverages a host of previously disparate capabilities featured in other strains of malware. For example, it uses NSA exploits while mining Monero, a cryptocurrency. Malware is continuing to grow more sophisticated, compelling organizations to adopt advanced anti-malware solutions.

Stresspaint malware hunts Facebook credentials

Disguised as a stress-relieving paint program, Stresspaint is a piece of malware that is attacking users in an attempt to gather their Facebook credentials. In particular, the malware is targeting influential users – those who manage Facebook pages or have numerous friends and followers. It is primarily distributed through emails and messages on Facebook.

MassMiner malware mines cryptocurrency

MassMiner is the latest in a slew of malware strains that engage in malicious cryptomining. This threat seeks to take advantage of known vulnerabilities in order to commandeer web servers and mine Monero – which continues to be a common target in malicious cryptomining.

Access Group Education Lending breached

Unfortunately for those who have used the organization’s services for their student loans, Access Group Education Lending has been breached. Nearly 17,000 borrowers had their information exposed when a loan processing vendor working for the group shared their information with an unauthorized, unknown company.

Fortunately for the enterprise, cloud access security brokers (CASBs) can defend against zero-day malware and countless other threats. To learn more, download the Zero-Day Solution Brief.