Predicting Cyber Security Trends in 2016

December 21, 2015 | Leave a Comment

By TK Keanini, Chief Technology Officer, Lancope

9632811349_5a06d2c6f7_zOne of my annual rituals is to take stock of the cyber security industry and determine what trends and challenges we are likely to see in the coming year. In the ever-evolving cyberspace, technology changes on a daily basis, and attackers are always there to take advantage of it.

But before we get into what is coming, I’d like to look back on my predictions for 2015 and see how clear my crystal ball was.

2015: Three out of four

Last year, I predicted four major cyber security trends would rise to prominence – or continue rising – in 2015: Muleware, re-authentication exploitation, ransomware and targeted extortionware.

Three out of the four came true with muleware being the odd one out because it is difficult to track. That said, there were some rumblings of hotel staff physically delivering exploits to laptops left in the rooms of certain persons of interest.

Re-authentication exploitation remains popular as more attackers realize a compromised email account can facilitate the theft of many different kinds of accounts for other websites. Once an attacker controls your email account, he can begin the “forgot password” process of a website and steal the password before you notice. We need to stop looking at password authentication as single point in time, but instead as an entire lifestyle. You could have the strongest password system in the world, but if the re-authentication process is weak, then the attacker has the upper hand.

Ransomware continues to thrive in the current environment and has expanded from only Windows to Apple, Android and Linux. These attacks are countered with proper backups, which are cheaper and easier than ever, but organizations are still failing to back up their data. This method has proved to be lucrative for attackers, and as long as people are still vulnerable to it, ransomware will become even more popular.

Targeted extortionware seeks to steal sensitive data about a person and threaten to publish the data publicly if the victim doesn’t pay up. Everyone has something they would like to keep secret, and some are undoubtedly willing to pay for it. Events like the breach at adult matchmaking site Ashley Madison led to cases of extortionware, and this trend is likely to continue in 2016.

What to expect in 2016

If 2014 was the “Year of the Data Breach,” then 2015 is on track to match it. We saw insurance companies, dating sites, U.S. federal agencies, surveillance technology companies and more fall victim to attacks this year, and there are no reasons to believe it is going to slow down in 2016.

Cracking as a service
Encryption has always been a moving target. As technology becomes more advanced, encryption has to evolve with it or else it becomes too easy to crack. Certain trends such as Bitcoin mining have already led to large farms of compute clusters that could be setup for cryptanalysis without a lot effort. Like any other Software as a Service provider, it could be as simple as setting up an account. You could submit a key with some metadata and within a few minutes – maybe even seconds – a clear-text WEP key is delivered. This could include different hashes and ciphertext. Charging per compute cycle would make it an elastic business. A development such as this would require everyone to utilize longer key lengths or risk compromise.

DNA breach
Every year, more and more sensitive data is stored on Internet-connected machines, and health data in particular is on the rise. Millions of people use DNA services that track an individual’s genetic history or search for markers of disease, and it is only a matter of time until a DNA repository is compromised. Unlike a credit card number or an account password, health information cannot be changed, which mean once it is compromised, it is compromised forever. This makes it an exceptionally juicy target for attackers. A breach like this could affect millions, and compensation would be impossible.

Attack on the overlay network
As more and more organizations rush to develop and implement software-defined networking (SDN), there is widespread adoption of microarchitectures like Docker containers. In the case of Docker, VXLAN tagging facilitates an overlay network that defines the structure of the system of applications. This could have severe security implications if there is no effective entity authenticating and checking the tags. Without adequate authentication, attackers could impersonate or abuse a tag, giving them privileged access to the system and data stored within.

VXLAN is only one example of overlay technology, and frankly, there has not been enough threat modeling to determine how vulnerable it is to attack. Like all new technologies, if we don’t give enough thought to security during development, attackers will discover the vulnerabilities for us. There will be exploitation of overlay networks in 2016, and then defenders will be forced to implement security in the middle of a vulnerable and hostile environment.

Namespace is the new battleground
Software developers are quickly adopting container technology to ensure performance is consistent across different machines and environments. When hypervisor-based virtualization became common, attackers learned how to compromise the hypervisor to gain control of the operating systems on virtual machines. With container technology like Docker, these attacks take aim at namespaces in userland, including networking, processes and filesystem namespaces. In the coming year, there will be attacks originating from malicious containers trying to share the same namespace as legitimate ones. A compromise like this could give attackers complete control of the container and potentially allow them to erase all evidence of the attack.

There are companies working on cryptographic methods of securing namespace, but until a major attack on these systems take place, there won’t be a lot of demand for this as a required feature.

New approaches for new technology
Whenever new technology receives widespread adoption, people often attempt to apply old security principles to them. In some cases that works, but it often creates inefficiencies and vulnerabilities. When virtual machines first became popular, operators would often attempt to patch VMs like they were a physical machine. It didn’t take long for them to realize it was quicker and easier to just kill the VM and start a new one with up-to-date software.

As we run headlong into new technology and continue to connect more and more sensitive information to the Internet, we must consider the security implications before a breach occurs. Every year attackers develop more ways to monetize and facilitate cybercrimes, and if we fail to evolve with them then we are inviting disaster.

Share this content on your favorite social network today!

Comments:

Be the first to comment on this post!

Leave a Comment